9 Children’s Books About Farms

Here are my favorite children’s books about farms. The traditional storybook farm (e.g. Old MacDonald’s farm) is radically different from modern farms. The books below are all wonderful children’s books that together give children a slightly more realistic introduction to how food is produced.

Note: If I were serious about conveying accurate information to my kids about farming, I would purchase a bulk lot of 10,000 chickens for my kids to raise on their toy farm. Instead, my kids’ toy farm has 2 chickens, 2 cows, 2 horses, and 1 tiny tractor that pulls a cart.

Farm Alphabet Book by Jane Miller. Introduces babies and young kids to things found on farms with clear, high-contrast photos. Farm Alphabet Book also includes information about farms for older kids. (e.g. “Pp pig This mother pig is called a sow. A father pig is a boar. The young pig is a piglet.”) Ages 0+

Barnyard Banter by Denise Flemming. Beautiful illustrations of farm animals and a catchy, rhyming text. Kids will enjoy searching for goose, hiding on each page. Ages 2+


Little Lamb by Kim Lewis. A very short story about a girl, Katie, meeting and feeding a lamb. Your child can imagine what it would be like to feed a lamb as well. Ages 2+


Apple Farmer Annie by Monica Wellington. One of my children’s favorites. Apple Farmer Annie describes Annie harvesting apples; making applesauce, apple cider, and more; and selling her apples and apple products at the farmers’ market. Ages 3+

Winter on the Farm by Laura Ingalls Wilder, Jody Wheeler, and Renee Graef. A true story about a boy named Almonzo who lived with his family on a New York farm in the late 1800s. Adapted from Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Farmer Boy, Winter on the Farm describes Almonzo helping his father and older brother care for their animals. Ages 3+

Tractor by Craig McFarland Brown. Describes how a farmer uses his modest tractor and attachments to prepare the soil, plant seeds, harvest corn, and haul the corn to a roadside stand. At the back of the book, each attachment is described in detail. Tractor has nice, cozy illustrations of the farmer’s faithful dog following the tractor, robins caring for their young, and rolling hills. Ages 3+

Maple Syrup Season by Ann Purmell. With the tone of a storybook, Maple Syrup Season has a lot of information about how maple syrup is made. The book describes the Brockwell family collecting sap, boiling the sap, and making maple syrup. I love the colorful, detailed illustrations, which include birds and other animals looking on. Christmas Tree Farm is another excellent book by Ann Purmell, this time about a Christmas tree farm. Ages 4+

The Year at Maple Hill Farm by Alice Provensen and Martin Provensen. Written in 1978, The Year at Maple Hill Farm describes a storybook farm with cows, chickens, sheep, horses, goats, pigs, corn, and pumpkins. While the farm described is dated, the detailed illustrations of the farm and descriptions of how the farm changes from one season to the next remain appealing. Ages 4+

Life on a Goat Farm by Judy Wolfman. One in a series of great, informative books about various types of farms. Told from the perspective of a young boy named Jimmy, Life on a Goat Farm makes living on a goat farm sound like fun, explains the hard work involved in taking care of goats, and shares a lot of information that will be interesting to adults as well as kids (e.g. why and how farmers dehorn goats). Others in the series include: Life on a Dairy Farm, Life on a Crop Farm, Life on a Sheep Farm, and more. Ages 5+

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11 Responses to 9 Children’s Books About Farms

  1. Monika says:

    hi, can any suggest books for older child, Rebekah is 8 and wants to be a farmer. Her younger sister 5 wants to be zoo keeper. Any ideas? please.

    • Amy says:

      Hi, Monika. For Rebekah, you could try Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, On the Banks of Plum Creek by Laura Ingalls Wilder, How Grownhog’s Garden Grey by Lynne Cherry or Blue Potatoes, Orange Tomatoes by Rosalind Creasy. A zoo-themed booklist is coming fairly soon. So, stay tuned for that. In the meantime, you could try a book in Carolyn Arnold’s series of picture books about various animals. Two books that won’t win any awards but will appeal to kids who want to read details about what zoos are like: I Am a Zookeaper by Cynthia Benjamin and My Trip to the Zoo by Aliki. She might also enjoy two wonderful picture book biographies about Jane Goodall: Me…Jane by Patrick McDonnell and The Watcher by Jeanette Winter. Hope that’s helpful!

      • Anonymous says:

        Thank you very much, will write the list to Father Christmas, Rebekah will enjoy new books about farm. Thank you again. To all.

  2. April says:

    We loved Winter on the Farm and all the other Little House books made for younger ones, I agree with the post above we loved The Big Red Barn. One of my favorites about the farming year is The OX Cart Man. Great selections! :)

  3. My son loves farm books! Thank you for sharing! One of his favorites is “Funny Farm” by Mark Teague.

  4. Jen says:

    Fun selection! Do you know ‘Farm,’ by Elisha Cooper? A lovely, realistic depiction of farm-life through the seasons. Probably for 4 or 5+. I think you’d like it. :)

    • Amy says:

      Oooooo…Thanks for mentioning it, Jen! I have read a review of it but not read the book yet! The cover art looks beautiful. I plan to begin revising some of these booklists in the fall when two of my three kids head off to school.

  5. Baby loves farm books! I’m going to bookmark this so I can revisit the books when he is ready for the next stage of books ;-)

  6. What a lovely collection of books about farms! We’ll have to look for several of these – thanks for the recommendations!

  7. Erinn L says:

    I really love the classic farm books: Big Red Barn by: Margaret Wise Brown and The Jolly Barnyard which is a Golden Book. This blog is making me want to dig out some of our old books we’ve packed up. :o)

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